Wall Street Journal Spends One Day With Arianna

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Videos

Arianna Huffington believes she can give you a better life. Though her point of view has shifted countless times over the decades, what’s never changed is her fierce advocacy for issues she cares about—which are many times political, but just as often personal.

Her first taste of fame came at 23 when, as a member of the University of Cambridge’s debate team, she published a book attacking women’s liberation. Two biographies followed, of Maria Callas and Pablo Picasso, before Huffington moved to the U.S. and became a right-wing advocate. In the late ’90s, her politics took a dramatic left turn, which led to the idea for her eponymous site.

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hand poem

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Mortgage Mess


A short article (especially the title) caught my eye the other day: McPherson (KS) Stentinel (6/29 ’12): “Prose poetry valid form” Many of [Mary Stone Dockery's] poems are prose poems, and she admitted some question if poetry written in prose style should be considered poetry. / In reading her book and listening to her read, I believe the prose poetry is an appropriate venue of expression. / I think too often poets confine themselves to rigid forms. Instead of the form…

Read this item at Housing Doom…


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Lung Diseases Leading Cause Of Death, Most People Don’t Know

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Health News

Despite lung disease killing 4 million people every year, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) revealed alarming data showing that most people are ignorant about lung disease, which kills more people than any other disease worldwide. The data was released to coincide with World Spirometry Day…
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In Syria, At Least 85 Killed By Car Bombing At Funeral

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under TOP HEADLINES

At least 85 people were killed when a car bomb exploded during a funeral procession Saturday evening in the Syrian town of Zamalka, activists and human rights groups said.

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Founding Fathers – Joseph Galloway

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Humor

Joseph Galloway, 1731 – 10 August 1803

Galloway was an American politician. Galloway became a Loyalist during the American War of Independence, after serving as delegate to the First Continental Congress from Pennsylvania. For much of his career in Pennsylvanian politics he was a close ally of Benjamin Franklin, and he became a leading figure in the colony. As a delegate to the Continental Congress Galloway was a moderate, and he proposed a Plan of Union which would have averted a full break from Britain. When this was rejected, Galloway moved increasingly towards Loyalism.  

Galloway was born near West River, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, the son of a landowner in the Colony. He moved with his father to Pennsylvania in 1749, where he received a liberal schooling. He studied law, for a time alongside William Franklin the son of Benjamin Franklin and later a fellow leading Loyalist, and was admitted to the bar and began to practice in Philadelphia.

Galloway soon became involved in the politics of the colony. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Provincial Assembly from 1756 to 1774 and served as Speaker of the House from 1766 to 1774. He was a prominent member of the faction which opposed Pennsylvania being a Proprietary Colony of the Penn family, and called for it to be turned into a Crown Colony. Both Galloway and Franklin devoted a great deal of effort in lobbying London to bring the colony directly under the Crown’s control.

Galloway was throughout his career a British-American nationalist, believing that the British Empire offered a citizen greater liberties than any nation on earth. He believed that most Americans would prefer to remain loyal to the Crown if only they were given a legitimate and effective government that would inspire their loyalty.

Galloway was a member of the Continental Congress in 1774, where he proposed a compromise plan for Union with Great Britain which would provide the colonies with their own parliament subject to the Crown. The plan was rejected by the Continental Congress by one vote. He signed the nonimportation agreement, while at the same time he was opposed to independence for the thirteen colonies and remained loyal to the King. Ferling (1977) argues that Galloway’s conduct was motivated partly by opportunism, and partly by genuine philosophical principles. Galloway was a resident of cosmopolitan Philadelphia and an associate of Benjamin Franklin with whom he corresponded over the issues of American/colonial independence.

Galloway urged reform of the imperial administration and was critical of the trade laws, the Stamp Act of 1765, and the Townshend Acts enacted in 1767; and as early as 1765 he had a conciliatory plan to end the disputes between Britain and the colonies. He believed that the British had the right to tax and govern the colonies, keep the peace, and help the colonies to survive and flourish (although he did also believe the colonies’ words should be heard). Congress however voted to expunge Galloway’s plan from their journal, so he published it himself in 1775, reprimanding Congress for ignoring his correct analysis of Parliament’s powers and colonial rights. He proposed a written constitution and joint legislature for the whole British Empire. When rejected, he declined election to the Continental Congress.

In 1775, when the Assembly declined Galloway’s recommendation that it abandon its defiance of Britain, Galloway left the Assembly and the Congress while Franklin sided with the movement towards colonial independence.

In December of 1776, Galloway joined the British General Howe and accompanied him on his capture of Philadelphia. During the British occupation, he was appointed Superintendent of Police, and headed the civil government. He had a reputation as a highly efficient administrator, but one who repeatedly interfered in military affairs. He aggressively organized the Loyalists in the city, but was dismayed when the British army decided to abandon the city in 1778 following France’s entry into the war. When the British army withdrew to New York, he went with them.

In 1778, he fled to Britain with his daughter, never to return to the colonies, and became a leading spokesman of American Loyalists in London. In 1778 the General Assembly of Pennsylvania convicted him of high treason and confiscated his estates. Much of his property was the inheritance of his wife, Grace Growdon Galloway. They resided in Trevose Manor, now known as Growden Mansion, and owned much of the land which is now Bensalem, Pennsylvania In 1779 he appeared as a government witness in a parliamentary enquiry into the conduct of Lord Howe and General Howe during the Philadelphia Campaign of which he was deeply critical.

He was influential in convincing the British that a vast reservoir of Loyalist support could be tapped by aggressive leadership, thus setting up the British invasion of the South. After the war Galloway spent his remaining years in religious studies and writing in England.

He died in Watford, Hertfordshire, England on 10 August 1803.

 

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Rodney King Funeral: Rev. Al Sharpton Delivers Eulogy, Calls King ‘Symbol Of Forgiveness’

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under TOP HEADLINES

LOS ANGELES — Rodney King was remembered in Los Angeles on Saturday as a forgiving man who bore the scars of his infamous beating with dignity.

The Rev. Al Sharpton, who delivered the eulogy at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills, said before the funeral that King never showed bitterness to the officers who beat him.

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Keystone XL pipeline expansion driven by oil-rich tar sands in Alberta

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under TOP HEADLINES

Repairman Shawn Flett stood 30 feet above the ground on the deck of a truck the size of a house. He had just waved it gingerly into the repair shop as if guiding an airplane into a hangar.

This is a beast of a machine, with 14-foot tires and weighing in at more than a million pounds. The truck burns 50 gallons of diesel an hour as it rumbles with 400-ton loads across the giant open-pit mines that have transformed a swath of Alberta’s vast northern forest into unsightly but lucrative sources of oil.

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AstraZeneca hungry to refill medicine cabinet

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Health News

LONDON (Reuters) – Simon Lowth may only be the interim chief executive of AstraZeneca Plc but he is ready to sign off on bold deals. The decision to pair up with Bristol-Myers Squibb Co to buy diabetes specialist Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc shows t…
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Afghanistan Bomb Attack Kills 2 Policemen

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under TOP HEADLINES

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan officials say a bomb has killed two policemen outside a bank in an eastern city.

Paktia provincial government spokesman Rohullah Samon says an explosive strapped to a bicycle went off Saturday near a Kabul Bank branch in Gardez, the provincial capital. Samon says the target of the blast was not clear.

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Allen for U.S. Senate Money Bomb!

June 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Total Nonsense

This week’s SCOTUS decision has made the U.S. Senate race in Virginia more important than ever. George Allen is running to be the deciding vote to repeal Obamacare and he needs our help. Today is an important filing deadline, marking the end of the second quarter of fundraising. The more we can show our support [...]
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